How To Sing With Your Diaphragm (Part 2) – LESSON 4 – Craig Shimizu Voice

How To Sing With Your Diaphragm (Part 2) – LESSON 4 – Craig Shimizu Voice

To use the diaphragm correctly you need to be able to do two things: :25
Breathe diaphragmatically
Be able to pull stomach in while phonating
Difficulty of diaphragmatic training: no sensory nerves, you cannot actually feel the diaphragm moving 1:34
Where diaphragm is – anatomical model shown 2:05
How to tell what the diaphragm is doing be either feeling the solar plexus or feeling the bottom sides of the ribs 2:45
The problem of not controlling the diaphragm is uncontrolled breath release. 3:45
What we want to do with the diaphragm is to push it down during phonation 4:20
Training the diaphragm with the solar plexus 4:48
Training the diaphragm with the side of the ribs 5:50
Diaphragmatic exercise 1: blowing 6:05
Solar plexus:
Efficient air use during phonation should be about a spoonful per second 6:30
Average singing phrase is 3.5 seconds.
Side of ribs: 7:10
Diaphragmatic exercise 2: hiss 7:34
Diaphragmatic exercise 3: buzz 8:02
Diaphragmatic exercise 4: ee 8:49
Appoggio: Intricate coordination between stomach and diaphragm 9:25
Diaphragmatic exercise 5: scales 1-3-5-8-5-3-1 9:50
The ability to recover or inhale comfortably following an exercise is the key to know whether you’re using the stomach correctly 10:15
Diaphragmatic exercise 5: sing – practical application 10:28
Bring Him Home bridge demonstration

19 thoughts on “How To Sing With Your Diaphragm (Part 2) – LESSON 4 – Craig Shimizu Voice”

  1. Sandra Yamada

    I thought that actually seeing how you breathe while singing was most
    helpful. So the “loudness” and expression of a word or phrase are
    controlled by the diaphragm being pushed by the stomach?

  2. wow, this is like the best explanation I’ve seen of this and I’ve seen a
    ton. Kudos. Way to get right to it.

  3. Bruno Pires Mucheroni

    Shimizu, you got this… do more videos because you will have results here,
    you are a good teacher.
    Can you help with something about diaphragm? You say some where “you can
    just relax your stomach so your breath come in. 1. I have sinus problem,
    hardly breath from nose, is that work anyway? 2. So, i can think that
    breathing is just relaxing my stomach and press in, or i need to pull some
    air, and where i put this power to blow air?

    Sorry about english, im from Brazil.
    Thank you again!

  4. Thank you ,thank you !What a great analysis of appoggio ! So happy ! I have
    this every day in my warming up and awakening of the body !Ready to sing
    without stretching the vocal cords , so naturally !! thank you !!! Keep
    going !!

  5. Wow! Thank you very much !
    I’ve seen so many videos teaching about how to sing using stomach but still
    did not really get what they mean. Yours is the one that made me really
    understand enough how the application of diaphragm and stomach work
    together , thanks alot !

  6. Wow! Thank you very much !
    I’ve seen so many videos teaching about how to sing using stomach but still
    did not really get what they mean. Yours is the one that made me really
    understand enough how the application of diaphragm and stomach work
    together , thanks alot !

  7. This is amazing Master! I’ve been working in my breathing since a year but
    mostly because I do mountain climing and my breathing has always been a
    problem. Since that year I actually had made a progress with it, but just
    until these exercises I have realize how much power the diaphragm have! Is
    amazing the diference of how far and cold I can exhale the air now! Thank
    you very much! I will keep and eye on your work :)

  8. Hey Craig. Great video and channel. You really go into the right level of
    details which shows you know what you’re talking about which sets you apart
    from many other vocal channels / teachers. I have a few questions for you
    and a video request if I may:

    1) Does the stomach have to come in as you sing? I understand that the
    solar plexus and ribs need to stay firm but if we keep the stomach also
    firm is this actually wrong? I wouldn’t imagine it wrong to keep the
    stomach also firm as the important thing is to keep the diaphragm from
    rising up?

    2) Until now I’ve been learning from another vocal program that for breath
    support we should instead be bringing the lower stomach in (as if we’re
    stopping from urinating) and then harden that area and push down as if
    someone is about to punch you in the stomach. Just wondered your thoughts
    on that? I understand pushing down somewhat engages the solar plexus area
    by default, but i prefer your view to focus on solar plexus area as it
    seems more effective, unsurprisingly because it’s closer to the diaphragm
    and easier to focus attention to.

    3) Would abdominal exercises help to make the solar plexus stronger and
    help us with breath support / singing?

    Request: I think the real key to singing is practicing actual songs as i’m
    sure that many of us find doing scales comparatively easier and then when
    it comes to doing the actual song we struggle a lot… Could you please do
    a video which focuses on how we should approach actual songs and also
    recommend good popular songs we should practice i.e. songs you believe are
    at a difficulty level which are not too easy and not too difficult for most
    people? I find that most of the music i enjoy listening to and singing are
    probably too challenging for myself to sing properly, so would really
    appreciate some recommendations of which songs are good to practice and how
    to approach their difficult areas. Maybe it would be great to have a series
    on videos which each focus on individual songs.

    Sorry for the long comment and request. Thanks in advance!

  9. Thanks for making this video! It’s very helpful, esp. the part about the
    solar plexis. I still have a problem, however.

    I can’t breathe in much air using only diaphragmatic breathing. I can
    breathe small amounts of air without my shoulders and chest moving, but my
    stomach is only able to expand just a little. I notice that your stomach is
    able to expand a lot, as if you’ve just had a big meal, but I look like I
    just only had a small one. When I try to breathe in as much air as possible
    with my diaphragm, I feel tightness and pain in my stomach area. Is this
    related to lung capacity or the size of one’s rib cage?

  10. Thank you Craig.. No one else comes close to explaining this stuff in the
    way(s) that you do!! Much appreciated as always.

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