Here’s how to sing the high notes easily! Voice teacher Eric Bruner’s approach to teaching.

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Explanation of voice teacher Eric Bruner’s approach. Here’s how to sing the high notes easily! Eric demonstrates both good vocal technique and poor technique, and he tells you how this approach to singing will dramatically expand your vocal range and strength. This video was shot at a Sing With Power Vocal Studios singer workshop.

Here’s a link to another video of me teaching one method for pulling the back of the vocal chords together to help “find” head voice. This high note vocal exercise can be an invaluable tool to help “kick start” the beginning head voice for those having trouble finding it any other way.

Read my comments under the “About” section on the video, though! This is a temporary exercise only, and (like most exercises) isn’t meant to be used in extreme ranges, volume levels or long practice times. Again, read the description when you get to the video for more help with how to use it.

Here’s an article in response to the notion that one cannot pull the vocal cords together consciously or manually:

Eric teaches online voice lessons at www.SingWithPower.com.

He teaches a technique that shows you how to sing the high notes, allowing vocal access to the upper range without strain, without cracking, and with great control.

40 thoughts on “Here’s how to sing the high notes easily! Voice teacher Eric Bruner’s approach to teaching.

  1. stimmbänder eng zusammenkommen lassen, wenig luft aufwenden und nicht
    gepresst hoch singen. aber das ist bestimmt kein patentrezept für das
    singen von hohen tönen, da gehört mit sicherheit auch ne menge übung dazu,
    solche töne singen zu können.

  2. I’m on that side of the world doing some teaching occasionally. Keep in
    tough! In the meantime, maybe you’d like to do a Skype online voice lesson.
    Visit the Sing With Power website for details.

  3. I’m on that side of the world doing some teaching occasionally. Keep in
    tough! In the meantime, maybe you’d like to do a Skype online voice lesson.
    Visit the Sing With Power website for details.

  4. I’m on that side of the world doing some teaching occasionally. Keep in
    tough! In the meantime, maybe you’d like to do a Skype online voice lesson.
    Visit the Sing With Power website for details.

  5. I’m on that side of the world doing some teaching occasionally. Keep in
    tough! In the meantime, maybe you’d like to do a Skype online voice lesson.
    Visit the Sing With Power website for details.

  6. Hi, Alex! Well, I will agree with you that not everyone can just “find”
    their head voice on their own. I didn’t. Most of us have to have a teacher
    who understands how to guide the process. Good luck with the bigfoot search!

  7. Hi, Alex! Well, I will agree with you that not everyone can just “find”
    their head voice on their own. I didn’t. Most of us have to have a teacher
    who understands how to guide the process. Good luck with the bigfoot search!

  8. Thanks, Valentina. Vowel modification is an incredibly helpful tool. I use
    it with most students. Every individual has slightly different imbalances,
    so relying on any one concept will ultimately fail. That’s the unavoidable
    problem with teaching in any group situation, like this video. While vowel
    modification (narrowing) can be very helpful, it isn’t the actual cause of
    head voice. If a balanced head voice is working well without vowel
    adjustment, then it’s not necessary in that circumstance.

  9. You are correct, Gabatara. Technically, head voice, falsetto and chest
    voice are all in the throat because that is where the vocal cords are. I
    actually don’t like those terms because they can be confusing, but they are
    the terms handed down to us through hundreds of years of voice teaching. If
    they aren’t defined well, they can cause more problems than they’re worth.
    Thanks for your comment.

  10. Skype lessons are the same price as in-studio. Contact the studio for
    current pricing. Visit the Sing With Power website for contact info.

  11. Good observation, groovekitty70. As an end result, you shouldn’t even be
    physically aware of pitch. Even though I have videos and training programs
    that address general vocal training concepts that can be incredibly useful,
    nothing can ever completely substitute a good teacher working with you. You
    are correct about that.

  12. Absolutely correct. You should be physically unaware of high or low or
    middle notes. They will be very smoothly connected.

  13. I teach in-studio and Skype lessons. Contact the studio for current
    pricing. Visit the Sing With Power website for contact info. I’d love to me
    you!

  14. Look under the description / about section for this video. I give a link to
    another one of my teaching videos. It’s a video of me teaching one of
    several methods for pulling the back of the vocal chords together.

  15. I like the vocal fry. It’s a very good method. Another is a “funny” or
    “silly” voice sound. Look under the description / about section for this
    video. I give a link to another one of my teaching videos. It’s a video of
    me teaching one of several methods for pulling the back of the vocal chords
    together.

  16. Look under the description / about section for this video. I give a link
    to another one of my teaching videos. It’s a video of me teaching one of
    several methods for pulling the back of the vocal chords together.

  17. That’s a good way to keep the larynx from raising, and I will sometimes use
    that with my students. Thanks for the input.

  18. Many will say that one cannot consciously or mechanically bring the back of
    the cords together. They are wrong. Not only is it possible, there are
    specific instances that it is helpful to do this. A link to an article I
    wrote on the subject can be found in the About section of this video. The
    article is titled: “Can I directly control the vocal cords for an easier,
    clearer voice? Yes! (and no)”

  19. Many will say that one cannot consciously or mechanically bring the back
    of the cords together. They are wrong. Not only is it possible, there are
    specific instances that it is helpful to do this. A link to an article I
    wrote on the subject can be found in the About section of this video. The
    article is titled: “Can I directly control the vocal cords for an easier,
    clearer voice? Yes! (and no)”

  20. U shouldn’t try to consciously control the vocal cords…but find ways to
    sing that will control them…shouldn’t be a conscious action but a
    reaction I think

  21. This was very helpful, I was having the exact problem at 0:49. Later on in
    the video I didn’t quite understand what you meant by “pulling back on the
    vocal chord”. How do I do that? Will that make me be able to sing higher
    more efficiently rather than what I usually do like in this video at 0:49?

  22. Hi, guys. I’m sorry I haven’t been responsive to your questions. I’ve been
    working on a large training project which will likely take me several more
    months. I promise to answer your questions and post more videos after the
    project is finished. 

  23. I’ve added an annotation at 1:34 to give you a link to the explanation of
    pulling together the cords. Pulling the cords together can be as natural as
    doing a vocal fry, although you’ll only do it consciously to find that
    narrow approach to the upper notes. Many people can’t seem to find it on
    their own, so for those folks we’ll just nudge it a bit until it works
    automatically.

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